PRESS

ART MUSEUM GETS 2 ADDITIONS TO SCULPTURE GARDEN

MAY 3RD, 2019

BY DONNA FARLEY

"The first is a piece called “Bobby-Soxer” by local sculptor Ralph Freer. It was originally created from wood and then fabricated in aluminum by another area resident, Lee Cotrell, said museum Director Steve Whitworth.

“'It is a serious piece of sculpture but it is also fun,” Whitworth said of the tall blue figure. “It has great movement, and a very art deco flair to it.'”

LOCAL ARTIST PENS BOOK FOR CHILDREN

AUGUST 16TH, 2017

BY CHELSEA CORDIA

"What do a pixie, a pollywog and a rooster have in common?

Nearly nothing, it seems. So how is it possible the mismatched trio, through adventures and perhaps a few misadventures, eventually become lifelong friends?

By learning to understand each other's differences, said local artist Ralph Freer who penned "Piper's Posse, A Children's Story of Friendship.'"

AN ARTIST'S JOURNEY

JULY 9TH, 2015

BY TAMMY HILDERBRAND

"How does Ralph see his own art?

'I think art is a part of my legacy,' he concluded.

The art he sees being produced in the United States he notes is reflective of the evolution in our culture.

'There was a time our young industrial nation gave little regard to fine art. All the great art museums were in Europe. Now I see that changing. Our nation is maturing. Many people are beginning to understand the value in art. Art galleries and museums are appearing more and more in rural communities. I think we live in exciting times,' surmised the artist."

116 YEAR OLD COLLINS STORE BUILDING TUNRED INTO ART GALLERY

MAY 27TH, 2010

BY DONNA FARLEY

"More than 30 years after the one-time community center Collins Store closed, the great-grandson of its founder has found new purpose for the site.

Ralph Wayne Freer will open his art gallery, the Flying F Gallery, to the public for the first time Saturday. the sculptor held his first art show in 1978, the same year Collins Store was shuttered."

MARGARET HARWELL ART MUSEUM OPENING

DECEMBER 5TH, 2003

BY LINDSAY CUMMINGS

"'Typically, I will take a piece of wood anywhere from two feet to six feet long.' said Freer. 'I take a magic marker and explore with it the shapes that will fit into the particular piece of wood.'

Freer uses oil paints, wax, and stain to give his sculpture an added dimension. His work ranges from small pieces that will in the palm of your hand to pieces that stand 6 feet tall. 

'I hope people find them interesting and appealing,' said Freer. 'Just enjoy. Art's cool; it enhances your life.'"